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Published on January 28th, 2013 | by Gizmodo

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Why Facebook, Apple, and Google Will Fall Like the Roman Empire

John Naughton at the Guardian has a perfect—albeit obvious—observation: Despite their overwhelming dominance, Facebook and Apple will eventually fall. “History should teach us that for today’s technology industry titans, the only way is down.” That goes for Google, too. And Amazon.

Why Facebook, Apple, and Google Will Fall Like the Roman EmpireJohn Naughton at the Guardian has a perfect—albeit obvious—observation: Despite their overwhelming dominance, Facebook and Apple will eventually fall. “History should teach us that for today’s technology industry titans, the only way is down.” That goes for Google, too. And Amazon. It’s inevitable.

Naughton’s argument—familiar to historians and Guns ‘n Roses fans alike—is that nothing lasts forever. He realized aptly that truism applied to today’s tech giants after rereading Paul Kennedy’s The Rise and Fall of the Great Powers, which chronicles the history of Rome, Imperial Spain, and Britain.

When these companies were dominant, it was inconceivable that they would ever not be. Apple, Amazon, Google, and Facebook won’t be any different. They will not fall at the same time, but they all will. From his article:

It’s not that Apple will disappear. With over $100 Billion in the bank and the ability to churn out desirable products with great margins, they will continue to be a successful, profitable company for a long, long time. Most probably, it will become a Sony. Relevant, but not dominant. Amazon, despite its razor-thin profit margins, is likely here to stay in some capacity. Google may turn into yet another Microsoft.

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