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Published on February 16th, 2013 | by Gizmodo

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10 Tricks to Make Yourself a Dropbox Master

Dropbox is a robust independent file syncing tool (which Apple once tried to buy ) that recently hit the 100m user milestone . It’s arguably the most popular cloud service around, and for good reason. Keep your eye on the official forums too; in the past many gigabytes’ worth of bonus space has been given out for testing beta versions of mobile apps and entering Dropbox competitions.

10 Tricks to Make Yourself a Dropbox MasterDropbox is a robust independent file syncing tool (which Apple once tried to buy) that recently hit the 100m user milestone. It’s arguably the most popular cloud service around, and for good reason.

10 Tricks to Make Yourself a Dropbox Master

Keep your eye on the official forums too; in the past many gigabytes’ worth of bonus space has been given out for testing beta versions of mobile apps and entering Dropbox competitions.

Both the iOS and Android Dropbox apps have a feature enabling you to upload your camera photos and video automatically, with no further steps required. Delve into the settings for your Dropbox mobile app to find the feature, which can be configured to work on Wi-Fi only if you’re worried about data caps. You can then periodically delete the snaps and movie clips from your phone or tablet safe in the knowledge that they’re safe and sound on Dropbox. A recent acquisition suggests this functionality will be fleshed out further in the future, as Dropbox looks to stay ahead of other auto-upload apps (Facebook and Google+, to name but two). This feature is also in the desktop client, by the way, and pops up whenever you connect a camera or external storage.

Two-step verification essentially means you need more than a password to set up Dropbox on a new computer or device, and it’s something Gmail has offered for a while. Dropbox introduced the feature in August and while it makes the setup process slightly more inconvenient if you move to a new computer, it’s well worth it for the extra account protection. Two-step verification can be activated from the Security tab of the Dropbox Settings page, and once it’s up and running you’ll need a code from your mobile as well as your password to configure Dropbox on a new machine. From the Security tab you can also review the computers and apps currently linked to your Dropbox account.

You’ll need to add one of our favorite Web apps to the mix for this one, If This Then That. Sign up for the service and you can specify certain triggers—such as a new upload to Instagram or Flickr, or a picture you’re tagged in on Facebook—which then cause the image in question to be sent to your Dropbox automatically. There are lots of possibilities once you’ve authorized IFTTT to get its hands on your various social media accounts—you can back up any of your Flickr photos with a particular tag, for example, or save your Instagram favorites as soon as you’ve hit the heart button.

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